CONVENIO STCW PDF

International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers STCW , sets minimum qualification standards for masters , officers and watch personnel on seagoing merchant ships and large yachts. The Convention was significantly amended in The STCW Convention was the first to establish minimum basic requirements on training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers on an international level. Previously the minimum standards of training, certification and watchkeeping of officers and ratings were established by individual governments, usually without reference to practices in other countries. As a result, minimum standards and procedures varied widely, even though shipping is extremely international by nature.

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Puede estar intentando tener acceso a este sitio desde un explorador protegido en el servidor. Activar el modo de accesibilidad. Desactivar el modo de accesibilidad. Omitir los comandos de cinta. Saltar al contenido principal. Desactivar animaciones. Activar animaciones. Parece que el explorador no tiene JavaScript habilitado. STCW Convention.

Maritime Administrations. Recognized Certificates. Fraudulent Certificates. Model Courses. Maritime Training Institutes. Asociaciones y proyectos. Asociaciones y proyectos reference. Page Content. Amendments to the STCW Annex will normally enter into force one and a half years after being communicated to all Parties unless, in the meantime, they are rejected by one-third of the Parties or by Parties whose combined fleets represent 50 per cent of world tonnage.

Amongst the amendments adopted, there are a number of important changes to each chapter of the Convention and Code, including:. The amendments Adoption: May Entry into force: 1 January The amendments added new minimum mandatory training and certification requirements for persons to be designated as ship security officers SSOs. Further amendments to part A of the STCW Code added additional training requirements for the launching and recovery of fast rescue boats.

The amendments have been prepared in response to reports of injuries to seafarers in numerous incidents involving the launching and recovery of fast rescue boats in adverse weather conditions.

The Amendments Adoption: 9 December Entry into force: 1 January Amendments to the STCW Code are aimed at improving minimum standards of competence of crews, in particular relating to cargo securing, loading and unloading on bulk carriers, since these procedures have the potential to put undue stresses on the ship's structure.

The Amendments Adoption: June Entry into force: 1 January The amendments concern training for personnel on passenger ships. Related additions are also made to the STCW Code, covering Crowd management training; Familiarization training; Safety training for personnel providing direct service to passengers in passenger spaces; Passenger safety; and Crisis management and human behaviour training.

The amendments - a major revision The amendments, adopted by a Conference, represented a major revision of the Convention, in response to a recognized need to bring the Convention up to date and to respond to critics who pointed out the many vague phrases, such as "to the satisfaction of the Administration", which resulted in different interpretations being made.

Others complained that the Convention was never uniformly applied and did not impose any strict obligations on Parties regarding implementation. The amendments entered into force on 1 February However, until 1 February , Parties may continue to issue, recognize and endorse certificates which applied before that date in respect of seafarers who began training or seagoing service before 1 August One of the major features of the revision was the division of the technical annex into regulations, divided into Chapters as before, and a new STCW Code, to which many technical regulations have been transferred.

Part A of the Code is mandatory while Part B is recommended. Dividing the regulations up in this way makes administration easier and it also makes the task of revising and updating them more simple: for procedural and legal reasons there is no need to call a full conference to make changes to Codes. Some of the most important amendments adopted by the Conference concern Chapter I - General Provisions.

They include the following: Ensuring compliance with the Convention Parties to the Convention are required to provide detailed information to IMO concerning administrative measures taken to ensure compliance with the Convention. This represented the first time that IMO had been called upon to act in relation to compliance and implementation - generally, implementation is down to the flag States, while port State control also acts to ensure compliance.

The MSC then produces a list of Parties in compliance with the amendments. This can take place if certificates are not in order or if the ship is involved in a collision or grounding, if there is an illegal discharge of substances causing pollution or if the ship is manoeuvred in an erratic or unsafe manner, etc. Other regulations in chapter I include: Measures are introduced for watchkeeping personnel to prevent fatigue. Parties are required to establish procedures for investigating acts by persons to whom they have issued certificates that endanger safety or the environment.

Penalties and other disciplinary measures must be prescribed and enforced where the Convention is not complied with. Technical innovations, such as the use of simulators for training and assessment purposes have been recognized.

In order to assess the need for revalidation of certificates after 1 February , Parties must compare the standards of competence previously required with those specified in the appropriate certificate in part A of the STCW Code.

Chapter V: Special training requirements for personnel on certain types of ships Special requirements were introduced concerning the training and qualifications of personnel on board ro-ro passenger ships. Previously the only special requirements in the Convention concerned crews on tankers. This change was made in response to proposals made by the Panel of Experts set up to look into ro-ro safety following the capsize and sinking of the ferry Estonia in September Crews on ro-ro ferries have to receive training in technical aspects and also in crowd and crisis management and human behaviour.

Chapter VI: Emergency, occupational safety, medical care and survival functions The Chapter incorporates the previous Chapter VI: Proficiency in survival craft and includes mandatory minimum requirements for familiarization, basic safety training and instruction for all seafarers; mandatory minimum requirements for the issue of certificates of proficiency in survival craft, rescue boats and fast rescue boats; mandatory minimum requirements for training in advanced firefighting; and mandatory minimum requirements relating to medical first aid and medical care.

This involves enabling crews to gain training and certification in various departments of seafaring rather than being confined to one branch such as deck or engine room for their entire career. Although it is a relatively new concept, the Conference was anxious not to prevent its development. At the same time, the new Chapter is intended to ensure that safety and the environment are not threatened in any way.

The use of equivalent educational and training arrangements is permitted under article IX. Administrations are required to establish and enforce rest periods for watchkeeping personnel and to ensure that watch systems are so arranged that the efficiency of watchkeeping personnel is not impaired by fatigue.

Generally speaking, the Convention contains basic requirements which are then enlarged upon and explained in the Code. Part A of the Code is mandatory. The minimum standards of competence required for seagoing personnel are given in detail in a series of tables. Chapter II of the Code, for example, deals with standards regarding the master and deck department. Part B of the Code contains recommended guidance which is intended to help Parties implement the Convention.

The measures suggested are not mandatory and the examples given are only intended to illustrate how certain Convention requirements may be complied with. However, the recommendations in general represent an approach that has been harmonized by discussions within IMO and consultation with other international organizations.

It is expected that ships flying flags of countries that are not on the White List will be increasingly targeted by Port State Control inspectors. A Flag state Party that is on the White List may, as a matter of policy, elect not to accept seafarers with certificates issued by non White List countries for service on its ships. If it does accept such seafarers, they will be required by 1 February also to have an endorsement, issued by the flag state, to show that their certificate is recognized by the flag state.

Certificates issued and endorsed under the provisions of the STCW Convention will be valid until their expiry date. The list will be kept under review and may be added to as other countries meet the criteria for inclusion. Latest link of confirmed parties. The amendments Adoption : 25 May Entry into force : 1 January The amendments replaced Chapter V on special training for crews on tankers. Related Documents. The amendments Adoption: 7 July Entry into force: 1 February The amendments — a major revision Ensuring compliance with the Convention Port State control amendments — chapters II, III, IV amendments - Chapter V: Special training requirements for personnel on certain types of ships amendments - Chapter VI: Emergency, occupational safety, medical care and survival functions amendments - Chapter VII: Alternative certification amendments - Chapter VIII: Watchkeeping The STCW Code The "White List" The amendments - a major revision The amendments, adopted by a Conference, represented a major revision of the Convention, in response to a recognized need to bring the Convention up to date and to respond to critics who pointed out the many vague phrases, such as "to the satisfaction of the Administration", which resulted in different interpretations being made.

Previously the standards of training, certification and watchkeeping of officers and ratings were established by individual governments, usually without reference to practices in other countries.

As a result standards and procedures varied widely, even though shipping is the most international of all industries. The Convention prescribes minimum standards relating to training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers which countries are obliged to meet or exceed. The Articles of the Convention include requirements relating to issues surrounding certification and port State control.

One especially important feature of the Convention is that it applies to ships of non-party States when visiting ports of States which are Parties to the Convention. Article X requires Parties to apply the control measures to ships of all flags to the extent necessary to ensure that no more favourable treatment is given to ships entitled to fly the flag of a State which is not a Party than is given to ships entitled to fly the flag of a State that is a Party.

The difficulties which could arise for ships of States which are not Parties to the Convention is one reason why the Convention has received such wide acceptance. The Convention — Chapter I The technical provisions of the Convention are contained in an Annex, divided into six Chapters: The Convention - Chapter I:General provisions Includes a list of definitions of terms used in the annex. All certificates must include a translation into English, if that is not the official language of the issuing country.

The Convention - Chapter II: Master-deck department The Chapter establishes basic principles to be observed in keeping a navigational watch, covering such matters as watch arrangements, fitness for duty, navigation, navigational equipment, navigational duties and responsibilities, the duties of the look-out, navigation with a pilot on board and protection of the marine environment.

The regulations include mandatory minimum requirements for certificating masters and chief mates; for certification of officers in charge of a navigational watch; and for certification of deck ratings forming part of a navigational watch. The regulations also include basic principles to be observed in keeping watch in port and mandatory minimum requirements for a watch in port on ships carrying hazardous cargo.

The Convention - Chapter III: Engine department Includes basic principles to be observed in keeping an engineering watch; mandatory minimum requirements for certification of chief engineer officers and second engineer officers; mandatory minimum requirements for certification of engineer officers in charge of a watch in a traditionally manned engine room or designated duty officers in a periodically unmanned engine room; requirements to ensure the continued proficiency and updating of knowledge for engineer officers; mandatory minimum requirements for ratings forming part of an engine room watch.

The Chapter in STCW includes mandatory minimum requirements for certification of radio officers; provisions designed to ensure the continued proficiency and updating of knowledge of radio officers; and minimum requirements for certification of radiotelephone operators. The Convention - Chapter V: Special requirements for tankers The Chapter was designed to ensure that officers and ratings who are to have specific duties related to the cargo and cargo equipment of tankers shall have completed an appropriate shore-based fire-fighting course; and have completed either an appropriate period of shipboard service or an approved familiarization course.

Requirements are more stringent for masters and senior officers. Attention is paid not only to safety aspects but also to pollution prevention. The Chapter contains three regulations dealing with oil tankers, chemical tankers and liquefied gas tankers, respectively. The Convention - Chapter VI: Proficiency in survival craft The Chapter establishes requirements governing the issuing of certificates of proficiency in survival craft.

An appendix lists the minimum knowledge required for the issue of certificates of proficiency. Resolutions adopted by the Conference The Conference which adopted the STCW Convention also adopted a number of resolutions designed to back up the Convention itself. The resolutions, which are recommendatory rather than mandatory, incorporate more details than some of the Convention regulations. Resolution 1 - Basic principles to be observed in keeping a navigational watch.

An annex contains a recommendation on operational guidance for officers in charge of a navigational watch. Resolution 2 - Operational guidance for engineer officers in charge of an engineering watch. An annex to the resolution deals with engineering watch underway and at an unsheltered anchorage. Resolution 3 - Principles and operational guidance for deck officers in charge of a watch in port.

Detailed recommendations are contained in an annex. Resolution 4 - Principles and operational guidance for engineer officers in charge of an engineering watch in port. Recommendations are in an annex.

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